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Important Financial Actions To Take Before The End Of The Year

Important Financial Actions To Take Before The End Of The Year

| November 20, 2020
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This year has been one for the books. Most, if not all of us, have experienced canceled plans, work stoppages or adjustments, complicated family decisions, and (as if that weren’t enough) financial challenges. To add to the uncertainty, we don’t know what the near future will bring in regards to COVID-19, political turmoil, and our markets. How do you prepare when there is so much unknown? How can you look ahead to 2021 when you don’t even know what next week will bring? You go back to the basics. Here are 7 financial actions that could make all the difference as we near the end of 2020.

1. Take A Second Look At Your Budget

Even if your income hasn’t been affected by COVID-19, it’s likely that your spending has. Whenever you experience life changes, it’s wise to take another look at your budget to make sure your spending is in line with your goals and shift things around to manage your priorities. For example, this year might have shown you the importance of having financial margin and now you want to double down to get rid of debt. It’s also possible that many of your daily expenses have experienced some ups and downs. You might be spending less on gas and eating out, but more on groceries, masks, and online shopping, not to mention that prices on many basic items have increased. If you have experienced income changes, make sure you factor those in and adjust your spending accordingly. Go into 2021 with a rock-solid budget that helps you feel financially secure.

2. Rework Your Goals

Don’t be afraid to set new goals for 2021. Look at your new budget and priorities and find ways to work toward your savings goals. Get creative with things you want to accomplish next year. You may not be able to take that international trip you’ve been dreaming about, but you can get your family together for a local vacation or refocus your energy on tackling a home renovation. If you’re planning to retire, relocate, sell your business, or make any other big financial moves, identify now what changes you can make to smooth the transition. 

3. Don’t Skimp On Your Savings

If there’s one thing this year has taught us, it’s the importance of having an emergency fund. If you haven’t already, now is the time to ensure that you have enough money set aside to cover 3-6 months of necessary living expenses or unexpected extras. While these savings should be easily accessible, you also want your money to be working for you. Research different savings vehicles that will keep your money liquid but also pay a competitive interest rate. 

And while things seem uncertain, don’t shrink back from saving for the future or try to wait things out. Consistency and compound interest make all the difference in the growth of your investments. If possible, max out your contributions to your 401(k) by the end of the year to make the most of your retirement savings. For 2020, you can contribute as much as $19,500 (or $26,000 if you are age 50 or older). You might also consider contributing to a Roth IRA. In 2020, you can put up to $6,000 in any type of IRA. If you are over age 50, that amount goes up to $7,000 thanks to the $1,000 catch-up contribution. Finish the year strong by investing in your future!

4. Take Advantage Of Your Employee Benefits

While every employer has different rules that apply to the benefits they offer their employees, many benefits expire or reset at the end of the year. You work hard for these perks, so be sure to use them!

Medical And Dental Benefits

At the beginning of 2020, did you have good intentions of taking care of some dental work, blood tests, or other medical procedures lingering on your to-do list? Now’s the time to take advantage of all your healthcare needs before your deductible resets. Dental plans in particular often have a maximum coverage amount. If you haven’t used the full amount and anticipate any treatments, make it a priority to set an appointment before December 31st.

Flexible Spending Account

Like your health insurance benefits, you’ll want to use up as much of your FSA (flexible spending account) dollars as possible by the end of the year. Rules only allow you to carry over $500 to the next plan year. Check the restrictions to see what you can use the money for, and take care of any needs your plan allows.

Sick And Vacation Time

Depending on your company, your sick or vacation time might expire at the end of the year. Check with your HR department to learn about any expiration dates. If it does expire, fit in a last-minute staycation or take some time off to work on projects you’ve been putting off. If you need to make any trips to the doctor, schedule those appointments now to make use of paid-time-off benefits before you lose them.

5. Revisit Your Plans And Policies

Along with updating your budget, take another look at your estate plan and insurance coverage. If you took the time and energy to create an estate plan, check it periodically to ensure all the documents are up to date and no major details have changed. If you change a beneficiary in one place, such as a life insurance policy, make sure you are consistent with your other documents to avoid confusion. 

Your insurance needs may change as the year goes by, so periodically review your coverages and designated beneficiaries to bring them up to date to reflect your current financial situation. For example, if you paid off debt, you may not need as much life insurance coverage since your family’s liabilities have decreased. You might also want to evaluate your need for other types of insurance, such as long-term care or disability insurance. 

6. Give When And Where You Can

The end of the year is always a good time to make your charitable contributions so you can benefit from itemizing the deduction on your tax return, but this year in particular many worthy organizations are struggling to make ends meet. Support local nonprofits or charities that share your values, and make the end of this year brighter for someone else. You can even donate appreciated securities, which may help you avoid paying taxes on the gains.

If gifting is one of your long-term financial goals, it’s never too early to start planning for the legacy you want to leave your loved ones without sharing a good portion of it with Uncle Sam.

Each year you can give up to $15,000 to as many people as you wish without those gifts counting against your lifetime exemption of $11.58 million. If you’ve yet to give this year or haven’t reached the $15,000 limit for a particular recipient, make sure you do this by December 31st.

7. Find An Advocate

If this year has taught us anything, it’s that we all need each other’s support. Before the year is over, seek out a financial professional who can take an objective look at your financial situation and help you take your finances to the next level regardless of what comes your way in the coming months and year. In a time of heightened emotions, dramatic headlines, and a temptation to panic, you need to know you have someone in your court watching out for your money and making sure you are on track to your ideal future. 

Our financial services team at T.A. Holland & Co. would love to partner with you on your financial journey. Get started now by reaching out to us at info@taholland.com or 617-523-5656 to schedule a complimentary appointment so we can get to know each other.

Information is provided by T.A. Holland & Co. and written by Indigo Marketing Agency, a non-affiliate of Cetera Advisor Networks LLC.

Distributions from traditional IRAs and employer sponsored retirement plans are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken prior to reaching age 59½, may be subject to an additional 10% IRS tax penalty. A Roth IRA offers tax free withdrawals on taxable contributions. To qualify for the tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal of earnings, a Roth IRA must be in place for at least five tax years, and the distribution must take place after age 59½ or due to death, disability, or a first time home purchase (up to a $10,000 lifetime maximum). Depending on state law, Roth IRA distributions may be subject to state taxes.

All investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal. There is no assurance that any investment strategy will be successful.

For a comprehensive review of your personal situation, always consult with a tax or legal advisor. Neither Cetera Advisor Networks LLC. nor any of its representatives may give legal or tax advice.

About T.A. Holland & Co.

T.A. Holland & Co. was founded in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1920 and serves individuals and businesses throughout the country with their financial needs. We provide cutting-edge financial services with a broad array of solutions to help our clients grow and preserve their wealth. We have seen good and bad economic times. Throughout it all, T.A. Holland & Co. has thrived by always making the customer our number-one priority. We get to know you and understand your needs so we can provide you with the proper guidance and strategies. Our senior vice president, John Hellmuth, has been at the helm of T.A. Holland’s financial services since 1990, but he doesn’t do this job alone. He is joined by his two children, Lindsay Hellmuth and Thomas Hellmuth. As CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® (CFP®) practitioners, our financial services team has the knowledge and experience to help you solve your most pressing financial challenges. To learn more about how we can help you, visit our website and reach out to us to schedule a complimentary get-acquainted meeting.

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